Workplace Safety

Six Steps to Workplace Safety

 

1) Perform a Facility Safety Analysisworkplace_safety-2

  • Conduct a thorough analysis of plant operations.
  • Inspect work areas, shipping and receiving areas, and equipment.
  • Examine accident and injury reports.
  • Identify operations and areas that present hazards.

2) Select Personal Protective Equipment (PPE)

  • Select personal protective equipment designed for a specific operation or hazard (i.e., cut-resistant or heat-resistant gloves, etc.)
  • Protective equipment must meet the current standards outlined by the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970 (OSHAct) and subsequent revisions.
  • PPE should meet appropriate OSHA 29 CFR 1910 standards.
  • Have equipment fitted by an PPE professional or someone trained to do this.

3) Require Compliance for NFPA 70e/Arc Flash and other mandatory safety programs

  • For maximum protection against hand injury, establish a 100 percent mandatory program that requires protection throughout all operations areas of your plant.
  • Mandatory programs prevent injuries better and are easier to enforce than those limited to certain departments, areas or jobs.
  • Provide the means for maintenance and require each worker to be responsible for his or her own gloves and other safety equipment.

4) Plan for Emergencies

  • Establish first-aid procedures for injuries.
  • Make eyewash stations accessible, particularly where chemicals are used.
  • Train employees in basic first aid and identify those with more advanced first-aid training.

5) Train and Educate

  • Conduct ongoing educational programs to establish, maintain and reinforce the need for personal protective equipment.
  • Add workplace safety to your regular employee education/training and orientation programs.
  • All management personnel should set an example by wearing protective equipment whenever and wherever required.
  • Continually review and, when necessary, revise your accident prevention strategies. Aim for the elimination of all accidents and injuries.

6) Document/Put It in Writing

  • When all elements of your safety program have been established, be sure to put them in writing.
  • Display a copy of the policy in all employee areas, and include a review of the policy in new employee orientation.

For information on electrical safety requirements take a look at this article published in Facility Care magazine, Electrical Safety in the Workplace written by our VP and expert in the field, Robert J. St. Pierre.


Questions & Information

Contact us with questions or more information on creating a safer workplace:

Call: 877-252-2626 | Email: info@jacmangroupsafety.com | Click here to contact us

 


Other helpful links:     What is Arc Flash?        What is NFPA 70E?    


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