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What are the Top Electrical Hazards in the Workplace?

What are the Top Electrical Hazards in the Workplace?

Construction, manufacturing, and utility jobs are some of the leading industries in electrical accidents each year. It is estimated that about 9% of injury related deaths on construction sites are the result of electrocution and there are numerous electrical hazards construction workers are exposed to on a regular basis.

“According to the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), there are around 12 workplace injury fatalities every day in the U.S. Unfortunately, electrical accidents cause numerous injuries and even result in many deaths every year.”

The top electrical hazards in the workplace include exposed parts and electrical wires, damaged insulation, overhead power lines, improper use of equipment, wet conditions, and a power supply that is not grounded. Electrical hazards can have a variety of consequences, ranging from electrocution and shocks, to fires and even explosions. The outcomes of these hazards can be detrimental, often causing long-term complications for the worker if they survive the incident.

“In 2019, there were 166 electrical fatalities in the United States, with 8% of all electrical injuries fatal. The highest electrical fatality rate was in the construction industry, with utility workplaces the second highest.”

Even if a worker thinks they’re working safely, accidents do happen. There are steps that employers can take to minimize these risks – such as safety training, personal protective equipment, and regular inspections of both the equipment and job site.

 

See the full article here for more details on the common electrical hazards in the workplace.

OSHA ACCIDENT REPORT: Employee Contacts Energized Circuit and Is Electrocuted

OSHA ACCIDENT REPORT: Employee Contacts Energized Circuit and is Electrocuted

Accident: 118245.015 — Report ID: 0521700 — Event Date: 07/20/2019

Employee #1 and two coworkers, employed by an electrical services company, were installing wiring and Acuity Brands BLT/BLC LED Luminaire lights in a school classroom.
Employee #1, an electrician, was working from an 8-foot fiberglass ladder and checking an installed light that had shorted out. Coworker #1, the crew foreman, went to turn off the breaker that supplied power to the classroom. Before the power stopped transmitting to the room, Employee #1 made contact with an energized circuit, sustained an electrical shock, and fell from the ladder. Employee #1 was transported to the hospital, where he was pronounced dead from electrocution.

Click here for the full accident report details from OSHA.gov.