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Tully man who died at Novelis aluminum facility was electrocuted, deputies say

Tully man who died at Novelis aluminum facility was electrocuted, deputies say

A man who died while working at the Novelis Inc. aluminum factory in Oswego County on Friday morning appears to have been accidentally electrocuted, deputies said.

Peter Clark Jr., 54, of Tully, was electrocuted while working as a contractor at the Scriba factory, said the Oswego County Sheriff’s Office. He was pronounced dead at the scene.

Clark worked for Ridley Electric, a Syracuse company. Friday wasn’t the first time he had done a job at Novelis.

“Pete was a frequent visitor to our facility, and many of our employees knew him well and admired him at work and in the community,” said Leila Giancone, a Novelis spokeswoman.

Clark’s death remains under investigation, the sheriff’s office said.

Novelis, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration and Ridley Electric are also working together to investigate the deadly accident, Giacone said. She declined to release more information about what happened.

Clark was a member of the International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers Local 43 union.

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Site C Contractor Fined $662,102 by WorkSafeBC

WorkSafeBC fines Site C Contractor $662,102

FORT ST. JOHN, B.C. – Peace River Hydro Partners, has been fined $662,102.48 by WorkSafeBC.

The fine was imposed on August 21, 2019, after a worker sustained an electrical shock injury. A worker was able to access the main circuit breaker in a high-voltage electrical cabinet for tunnelling equipment.

According to WorkSafeBC, the main electrical breaker extensions on the exterior cabinet door were not functioning, the de-energization switches had been circumvented and the main breaker switch-box isolation covers were in disrepair.

WorkSafeBC staff also determined that it was a standard work practice at this site to access the main circuit breaker without following lockout procedures.

A stop-use order was issued for the tunnelling equipment because Peace River Hydro Partners failed to ensure its equipment was capable of safely performing its functions, and was unable to provide its workers with the information, instruction, training, and supervision necessary to ensure their health and safety.

WorkSafeBC says these were both repeated violations.

This is the largest fine WorkSafeBC can issue under B.C. legislation.  The report from WorkSafeBC did not disclose the condition of the worker or the exact date of the incident.

Click here for this article from EnergeticCity.ca