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What are the Top Electrical Hazards in the Workplace?

What are the Top Electrical Hazards in the Workplace?

Construction, manufacturing, and utility jobs are some of the leading industries in electrical accidents each year. It is estimated that about 9% of injury related deaths on construction sites are the result of electrocution and there are numerous electrical hazards construction workers are exposed to on a regular basis.

“According to the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), there are around 12 workplace injury fatalities every day in the U.S. Unfortunately, electrical accidents cause numerous injuries and even result in many deaths every year.”

The top electrical hazards in the workplace include exposed parts and electrical wires, damaged insulation, overhead power lines, improper use of equipment, wet conditions, and a power supply that is not grounded. Electrical hazards can have a variety of consequences, ranging from electrocution and shocks, to fires and even explosions. The outcomes of these hazards can be detrimental, often causing long-term complications for the worker if they survive the incident.

“In 2019, there were 166 electrical fatalities in the United States, with 8% of all electrical injuries fatal. The highest electrical fatality rate was in the construction industry, with utility workplaces the second highest.”

Even if a worker thinks they’re working safely, accidents do happen. There are steps that employers can take to minimize these risks – such as safety training, personal protective equipment, and regular inspections of both the equipment and job site.

 

See the full article here for more details on the common electrical hazards in the workplace.

OSHA Cites Metal Extraction Facility After Workers Burned by Arc Flash

OSHA Cites Metal Extraction Facility After Workers Burned by Arc Flash

ASARCO faces $278,456 in penalties for two willful violations and one serious violation.

The U.S. Department of Labor’s Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) has cited ASARCO – a metal smelting company – for electrical hazards after an arc flash caused three workers to suffer severe burns at its facility in Hayden, Arizona. The company faces $278,456 in penalties for two willful violations and one serious violation.

OSHA inspectors determined the arc flash occurred after the insertion of a breaker into a 4,160-volt switchgear. OSHA cited the company for its failure to provide a pre-job briefing before work began on the energized switchgear, render the electrical breaker inoperable before work began, and ensure the injured employees had arc-flash protective clothing.

“Employers must not jeopardize the safety of workers,” said OSHA Regional Administrator Barbara Goto, in San Francisco, California. “Arc flash hazards are well known, but can be eliminated when workers are properly trained and protective equipment is provided.”

 Click here for the OSHA News

 

OSHA Issues 22 Citations for Safety & Health Hazards at Tire Manufacturing Facility

OSHA News Release Region 4

U.S. Department of Labor Cites Georgia Tire Manufacturer And Contractors for 22 Safety and Health Violations

MACON, GA – The U.S. Department of Labor’s Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) has issued a combined 22 citations to Kumho Tire Georgia Inc., Sae Joong Mold Inc., and J-Brothers Inc. after a follow-up inspection found safety and health hazards at the tire manufacturing facility in Macon, Georgia. The three companies collectively face $523,895 in proposed penalties. 

OSHA cited Kumho Tire Georgia Inc. for exposing employees to fall, struck-by, and burn hazards; failing to follow hazardous energy control procedures when employees performed service and maintenance on machinery; failing to train employees on energy control procedures; and failing to provide machine guarding on various pieces of equipment throughout the facility. Proposed penalties total $507,299. OSHA initiated the follow-up inspection of the tire manufacturer after the Agency did not receive abatement documents regarding a June 2017 inspection and citations. Kumho has been placed in the Severe Violator Enforcement Program.

OSHA cited Sae Joong Mold Inc. for using damaged slings and electrical hazards. Proposed penalties total $9,093. The Agency cited J-Brothers Inc. for exposing employees to smoke inhalation and burn hazards by failing to mount portable fire extinguishers and failing to perform annual maintenance on fire extinguishers. Proposed penalties total $7,503.

Potential workplace hazards must be assessed and eliminated to ensure a safe work environment,” said OSHA Atlanta-East Area Director William Fulcher. “This employer exposed workers to multiple safety and health deficiencies that put them at risk for serious or fatal injuries.”

Click here for the actual News Release

U.S. Department of Labor Cites Ohio Recycling Company for Safety Violations

News Release

U.S. Department of Labor Cites Ohio Recycling Company for Safety Violations

COLUMBUS, OH – The U.S. Department of Labor’s Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) has cited Sewing Collection Inc. – a coat hanger recycling company – for serious and repeat safety violations. The Columbus, Ohio-based company faces proposed penalties totaling $190,247.

An inspection in April 2018 found that the company exposed employees to fall, machine guarding, and electrical hazards; failed to train forklift operators; and did not have proper emergency exit signage.

“Employers have a responsibility to conduct workplace hazard assessments regularly to determine appropriate measures at protecting workers’ safety and health,” said OSHA Columbus Area Office Director Larry Johnson. “This company’s failure to comply with federal safety requirements needlessly exposed employees to workplace injuries.”

Click here for more information and to read the news release directly from OSHA