Testimonials

Leamington Greenhouse fined $120K after fatal workplace accident

Leamington Greenhouse fined $120K after fatal electrical shock

A Leamington greenhouse has been fined $120,000 after a worker died from an electrical shock in November 2018.
[Worker, 29 dies after being electrocuted – November 19, 2018]

Great Lakes Greenhouses Inc., a cucumber grower, pled guilty to failing to comply with a section of the Occupational Health and Safety Act in provincial court this week.

During the fatal incident, the worker was re-arranging wiring and doing breaker work when he received the shock.

The electricity had not been properly locked out as required by law, according to a news release form the ministry.

Along with the $120,000 fine, the company is also required to pay a 25 per cent victim fine surcharge, which goes to a fund to assist victims of crime.

 
For more information:
CTV News Windsor
CTV News Windsor- Article from NOV 2018
BlackburnNews
 
 

 

 

 

Tully man who died at Novelis aluminum facility was electrocuted, deputies say

Tully man who died at Novelis aluminum facility was electrocuted, deputies say

A man who died while working at the Novelis Inc. aluminum factory in Oswego County on Friday morning appears to have been accidentally electrocuted, deputies said.

Peter Clark Jr., 54, of Tully, was electrocuted while working as a contractor at the Scriba factory, said the Oswego County Sheriff’s Office. He was pronounced dead at the scene.

Clark worked for Ridley Electric, a Syracuse company. Friday wasn’t the first time he had done a job at Novelis.

“Pete was a frequent visitor to our facility, and many of our employees knew him well and admired him at work and in the community,” said Leila Giancone, a Novelis spokeswoman.

Clark’s death remains under investigation, the sheriff’s office said.

Novelis, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration and Ridley Electric are also working together to investigate the deadly accident, Giacone said. She declined to release more information about what happened.

Clark was a member of the International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers Local 43 union.

Click here for the full article

OSHA fines Waukegan plant after explosion kills 4, including 3 from Kenosha Count

OSHA fines Waukegan plant after explosion kills 4, including 3 from Kenosha Count

Investigators continue to search for one missing person in the rubble of the former factory.

WAUKEGAN, Ill. — The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) has fined an Illinois plant following an explosion that killed four workers.

The Waukegan-based company, AB Specialty Silicones, is facing $1.59 million in fines for 12 federal safety violations after four employees were killed in an explosion on May 3, 2019. Three of the four killed were from Kenosha County.

OSHA investigators determined that “AB Specialty Silicones failed to ensure that electrical equipment and installations in the production area of the plant complied with OSHA electrical standards, and were approved for hazardous locations.”

The Principal Deputy Assistant Secretary of Labor for Occupational Safety and Health Loren Sweatt said, “By ignoring safety and health requirements, this employer created an unsafe work environment with deadly consequences.”

Click here for the entire story from WTMJ-TV Milwaukee

Construction worker critically injured in electrical accident in Jacksonville

Jacksonville police say boom truck lifting traffic signal hit energized line

JACKSONVILLE, Fla. – A construction worker installing traffic signals Friday morning on North Kernan Boulevard in East Arlington was critically injured when a boom truck he was in hit a high power transmission line, according to the Jacksonville Sheriff’s Office.

The man operating the crane was doing electrical work for a subcontractor working on a Jacksonville Transportation Authority, tried to get off the truck but was shocked. Police said the victim was hospitalized in life-threatening condition.

Residents in the area heard what sounded like an explosion, smelled something burning and came outside to see what was happening.

“We got to the stop sign and there was a gentleman that had grabbed (the victim) and put him on the ground and started doing CPR,” Angela Ahern said. “(Paramedics) had to pull him away and when they did, he dropped to the ground and four guys got on the ground with him and held him. Every guy over there was crying.”

The JEA told News4Jax the utility has no record of a request from the subcontractor or the contractor, Superior Construction, to turn off power to the transmission lines in the area while the traffic lights were being installed.

According to the JTA, the man is an employee of James D. Hinson Electrical Contracting Co. Inc. The company told News4Jax it would not be making a comment.

JTA spokesman David Cawton II released a statement Friday afternoon:

“JTA’s main concern is the health and well-being of the subcontractor who was seriously injured today while working on the Kernan Blvd. improvement project, part of JTA’s MobiltyWorks program. We are fully cooperating with authorities as they investigate the cause of the accident.”

Police and the Occupational Safety and Health Administration were on the scene, investigating.

Click here for the story from WJXT News4Jax

Employer willfully failed to train employee for the hazardous electrical work he was directed to perform

OSHA News Release – Region 2

The Occupational Safety and Health Review Commission (OSHRC) has issued a decision affirming all safety and health citations issued by the U.S. Department of Labor’s Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) against Jersey City Medical Center. OSHA cited the medical center, based in Jersey City, NJ,  for electrical hazards after a maintenance employee’s fatal fall after receiving an electric shock. The judge also affirmed OSHA’s proposed penalties totaling $174,593.

In June 2016, the decedent – who was untrained in electrical safety work practices – was repairing a ceiling light fixture when the incident occurred. The judge found that the employer willfully failed to train the employee for the hazardous electrical work he was directed to perform. A three-day hearing was held in New York City in April 2018, and the decision from OSHRC issued on June 17, 2019.

“The outcome of this case shows the employer will be held accountable for willfully exposing employees to serious hazards, and the U.S. Department of Labor stands ready to litigate such issues when employers refuse to accept responsibility,” said the Department’s Regional Solicitor Jeffrey S. Rogoff, in New York.

Under the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970, employers are responsible for providing safe and healthful workplaces for their employees. OSHA’s role is to help ensure these conditions for American working men and women by setting and enforcing standards, and providing training, education, and assistance. For more information, visit https://www.osha.gov.

OSHA Cites Metal Extraction Facility After Workers Burned by Arc Flash

OSHA Cites Metal Extraction Facility After Workers Burned by Arc Flash

ASARCO faces $278,456 in penalties for two willful violations and one serious violation.

The U.S. Department of Labor’s Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) has cited ASARCO – a metal smelting company – for electrical hazards after an arc flash caused three workers to suffer severe burns at its facility in Hayden, Arizona. The company faces $278,456 in penalties for two willful violations and one serious violation.

OSHA inspectors determined the arc flash occurred after the insertion of a breaker into a 4,160-volt switchgear. OSHA cited the company for its failure to provide a pre-job briefing before work began on the energized switchgear, render the electrical breaker inoperable before work began, and ensure the injured employees had arc-flash protective clothing.

“Employers must not jeopardize the safety of workers,” said OSHA Regional Administrator Barbara Goto, in San Francisco, California. “Arc flash hazards are well known, but can be eliminated when workers are properly trained and protective equipment is provided.”

 Click here for the OSHA News