Testimonials

Empire State Mine resumes underground mining operations

Empire State Mine resumes underground mining operations after a hoist malfunction on Friday, that was caused by an “electrical problem”.

140 workers were unable to go back underground in the mine because of an accident that happened Friday, when an elevator taking workers down into the mine abruptly stopped and injured 9 workers. 

Mine officials say the elevator stopped because the braking system malfunctioned. 

Two of the injured miners are recovering at home. Mine officials say one has a dislocated knee; the other a broken ankle.

Below is the full news release from Empire State Mine:

Underground mining operations have resumed at the Empire State Mine following a hoist incident that occurred on July 27, 2018. During routine transportation of personnel underground, the braking system on the personnel conveyance (“cage”) unexpectedly engaged causing it to stop abruptly. The braking system then released, causing the cage to resume its travel downwards at normal speed at which time the hoist operator pushed the emergency stop button, bringing the cage to a controlled stop before returning the personnel to the surface.

Of the 30 contractors travelling in the cage, nine had injuries ranging from sprains and strains to a fracture, and were treated at local hospitals. Seven of the contractors were released immediately. The remaining contractors, one of whom had a dislocated knee and the other a fractured ankle, are at home recovering. Mine management has been in regular contact with the individuals affected by the incident, and their families, to provide support.

The incident was investigated by the company, third party hoist engineering experts, and the Mine Safety and Health Administration (“MSHA”). The cause of the incident was electrical in nature, and immediate corrective actions have been taken. Additional safeguards, including backup power supply, are being implemented to prevent recurrence.

The operation of the hoist has been approved by MSHA and underground operations resumed late yesterday.

The safety and well-being of our people is our top priority as we ramp up production at the Empire State Mine,” stated Keith Boyle, Chief Operating Officer. 

Click here for the article directly from WWNY

Contractor suffered severe electrical burns in accident

NORTH HAVEN, Conn. (WTNH) – Fire crews are on scene at a North Haven business after a person suffered severe electrical burns in an accident on Wednesday morning.

The fire department says that emergency crews are on scene at Ulbrich Stainless Steels & Special Metals, Inc. at 55 Defco Park Road to treat an outdoor contractor with severe electrical burns following an accident within the building. 

The victim, who has not yet been identified, was taken to the Bridgeport Burn Center for treatment. Their current condition is unknown. 

Multiple agencies are on scene investigating the incident. United Illuminating is also on the scene to cut power off to the building and provide safety. 

There is no word on the nature of the accident at this time.

News 8 has a crew on the way to the scene. Check back for more updates.
Click here for the News 8 article

OSHA Citation: Worker electrocuted because employer did not ensure safety procedures were followed.

OSHA Regional News Release – Region 4

Worker electrocuted because his employer did not ensure safety procedures were followed
A preventable incident, OSHA report reveals

REDDICK, Fla. – Electrician’s apprentice was testing and repairing electrical transformers at a substation in Reddick when he was electrocuted by more than 10,000 volts. He was a 36-year-old husband and was a person who lived to make others happy.

On Oct. 15, 2014, he used a circuit testing technique that bypassed safety protocols designed to protect workers from electrical currents. He contacted an energized circuit and later died from injuries he sustained. The company knew workers bypassed safety protocols to conduct testing, but it did not enforce safety standards. Due to this practice, the company has a history of nonfatal shock injuries. 

The U.S. Department of Labor’s Occupational Safety and Health Administration inspected the utility company after learning of workers injury. OSHA found the company responsible for one willful and five serious safety violations. Proposed penalties total $90,000.

“[The Company] is aware of the fatal hazards that [the worker] and other workers are exposed to, but failed to implement control measures its safety team developed to protect employees,” said the director of OSHA’s Jacksonville Area Office. “This tragedy could have been prevented had management not delayed in making the workplace safe.”

To read more from this News Release from April 17th, 2015, click here.