Testimonials

OSHA fines TPC Group $514,692 for willful violations linked to explosion

OSHA fines TPC Group $514,692 for willful violations linked to explosion

TPC Group faces $514,692 in fines from the Occupational Safety and Health Administration and is accused of three willful violations — the most severe and rare category used by the agency — after OSHA concluded its investigation into the Nov. 27 plant explosion in Port Neches.

OSHA announced its conclusions Wednesday, giving some of the first official glimpses of potential failures at the plant since a vapor cloud explosion under a butadiene processing tower ignited flames that burned for weeks at the site and injured three people.

“OSHA cited TPC for three willful violations for failing to develop and implement procedures for emergency shutdown, and inspect and test process vessel and piping components,” representatives from the agency wrote in a statement.

Of the willful violations, OSHA concluded that TPC Group failed to provide updated instructions on how to shut down affected equipment, didn’t fix deficient equipment that could have caused the incident or alerted workers to a problem, and failed to use proper procedures on a pipeline design known to cause issues when using butadiene.

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OSHA cites solar contractor almost $40,000 after fatal electrocution of one of their workers

OSHA cites solar contractor almost $40,000 after fatal electrocution of one of their workers

The agency said Wednesday that it cited Power Factor LLC for four serious violations after the employee, who has not been identified, died July 24, 3018, while installing solar panels at the base. In their findings, the agency says the employee was hoisting a metal rail that came into contact with overhead power lines.

OSHA cited the company for allowing employees to work too closely to electrical power circuits without de-energizing and grounding the circuits, or guarding the circuits using insulation or other means. Officials also said the company didn’t regularly inspect the job site or train workers to recognize and avoid hazards.

“This tragedy could have been prevented if the employer had complied with electrical standards that require maintaining a safe distance from unprotected energized power lines, training employees, and providing personal protective equipment,” said OSHA Wichita Area Director Ryan Hodge.

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OSHA Cites Contractor after Employees Suffer Burns from an Arc Flash

U.S. Department of Labor Cites Tennessee Contractor
After Two Employees Burned at Nuclear Power Plant

SODDY DAISY, TN – The U.S. Department of Labor’s Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) has cited Day & Zimmerman NPS Inc. for exposing employees to electric shock hazards at the Tennessee Valley Authority Sequoyah Nuclear Power Plant in Soddy Daisy, Tennessee. The company faces $71,599 in proposed penalties.

Two employees pulling electrical cable suffered burns from an arc flash. OSHA cited the Chattanooga-based company for failing to require that employees wear protective clothing and equipment; conduct pre-job briefings with employees on energy source controls; removal of a ground and test device; and allow potential for residual electrical energy to accumulate.

“These serious injuries could have been prevented if the company had implemented effective work practices to reduce the risk of electric shock hazards,” said OSHA Nashville Area Office Director William Cochran.

Click here for more information and to read the news release directly from the U.S. Department of Labor

U.S. Department of Labor Cites Ohio Recycling Company for Safety Violations

News Release

U.S. Department of Labor Cites Ohio Recycling Company for Safety Violations

COLUMBUS, OH – The U.S. Department of Labor’s Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) has cited Sewing Collection Inc. – a coat hanger recycling company – for serious and repeat safety violations. The Columbus, Ohio-based company faces proposed penalties totaling $190,247.

An inspection in April 2018 found that the company exposed employees to fall, machine guarding, and electrical hazards; failed to train forklift operators; and did not have proper emergency exit signage.

“Employers have a responsibility to conduct workplace hazard assessments regularly to determine appropriate measures at protecting workers’ safety and health,” said OSHA Columbus Area Office Director Larry Johnson. “This company’s failure to comply with federal safety requirements needlessly exposed employees to workplace injuries.”

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Renewable Energy Company cited after fatality at New Hampshire Power Plant

 

U.S. Department of Labor Cites New Jersey Renewable Energy Company
Following Fatality at New Hampshire Power Plant

The U.S. Department of Labor’s Occupational Safety and Health Administration cited EWP Renewable Corp. doing business as Springfield Power L.L.C., for 25 safety violations after an employee suffered fatal injuries when he was pulled into a conveyor at the company’s Springfield plant in New Hampshire in November last year.

The Mount Laurel, New Jersey-based parent company faces $125,460 in proposed penalties. OSHA inspectors found that the conveyor and other machinery lacked required safety guarding, and employees were not trained in lockout/tagout procedures to prevent equipment from unintentionally starting.

Springfield Power was also cited by OSHA for fall hazards, electric shock and arc flash hazards, lack of adequate emergency evacuation and fire prevention, and hazardous energy control programs, according to a press release issued Friday, June 1st, 2018.

“This employer’s failure to protect employees resulted in a tragedy that could have been prevented if training was provided and machinery was appropriately guarded,” Rosemarie O. Cole, OSHA New Hampshire Area Director, said in the press statement.

The company has 15 business days from receipt of its citations and proposed penalties to comply, request an informal conference with OSHA’s area director, or contest the findings.

Click here for more information from this OSHA News Release