Testimonials

What are the Top Electrical Hazards in the Workplace?

What are the Top Electrical Hazards in the Workplace?

Construction, manufacturing, and utility jobs are some of the leading industries in electrical accidents each year. It is estimated that about 9% of injury related deaths on construction sites are the result of electrocution and there are numerous electrical hazards construction workers are exposed to on a regular basis.

“According to the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), there are around 12 workplace injury fatalities every day in the U.S. Unfortunately, electrical accidents cause numerous injuries and even result in many deaths every year.”

The top electrical hazards in the workplace include exposed parts and electrical wires, damaged insulation, overhead power lines, improper use of equipment, wet conditions, and a power supply that is not grounded. Electrical hazards can have a variety of consequences, ranging from electrocution and shocks, to fires and even explosions. The outcomes of these hazards can be detrimental, often causing long-term complications for the worker if they survive the incident.

“In 2019, there were 166 electrical fatalities in the United States, with 8% of all electrical injuries fatal. The highest electrical fatality rate was in the construction industry, with utility workplaces the second highest.”

Even if a worker thinks they’re working safely, accidents do happen. There are steps that employers can take to minimize these risks – such as safety training, personal protective equipment, and regular inspections of both the equipment and job site.

 

See the full article here for more details on the common electrical hazards in the workplace.

How often should electrical equipment be inspected?

OSHA Requirements for Electrical Equipment Inspection

Q: How often should electrical equipment be inspected?

That is determined by federal OSHA requirements for worker safety. Additional inspections may be required by local public safety, building, and fire regulations. While OSHA doesn’t have a specific rule as to how often electrical equipment must be inspected, they do follow the Standard for Electrical Safety in the Workplace (NFPA 70E) and use that as their guide while inspecting workplace violations. The National Electrical Code (NFPA 70), Guide on Electrical Inspections (NFPA 78), Standard for Electrical Safety in the Workplace (NFPA 70E), and National Electrical Safety Code (ANSI C2) all have specific electrical systems and equipment inspection procedures. In addition to those procedures, OSHA also requires that all instruments, equipment, and associated leads, power cords, cables, probes, and connectors are visually inspected for external damage prior to each use.

 

Read more from the full article here on the OSHA requirements for electrical equipment inspections

 

Maintenance worker suffers electrical shock

Maintenance worker suffers electrical shock in accident at Capitol Monday, rushed to hospital

On the morning of December 21st, first responders rushed to the State Capitol building in Baton Rouge where a maintenance employee was shocked in an electrical accident.

The injured employee is reportedly awake and expected to recover. Officials say the injured employee was rushed to the hospital shortly after the incident, and is expected to recover.

According to the United States Department of Labor, electrocution has been one of the leading causes of on-the-job deaths among construction workers for years.

Click here for the full story from WBRZ

PPE for Arc Flash Protection

You’ve been asking for our help with your PPE needs, we’re happy to announce we’re now providing our customers with the convenience of Arc Flash protection clothing, rubber insulated gloves, and double-insulated hand tools.

These are high quality products, made here in the USA, and our customers receive a discounted corporate rate on all products. With our corporate account, there are no contracts or minimum orders, next day shipping, as well as customizable orders.

PPE Kits available that are specially designed to meet NFPA 70E ARC Flash PPE Categories:

  • Category 2
  • Category 3
  • Category 4

Click here to learn more about available products.

Contact us for your discount authorization code to begin ordering your PPE:
Call:  (877) 252.2626 ext. 157   | Email:  PPE@jacmangroupsafety.com

MSHA Accident Report: July 9, 2020 Fatality

Hudson Sand Mine, Peach, Georgia – July 2020

The morning of July 9th, 2020, a mine superintendent with 36 years of mining experience lost his life when he contacted energized high-voltage components in a 4,160 volt (4,160 VAC), three-phase electrical enclosure.

The accident occurred because the mine operator’s policies, procedures, and training were inadequate to ensure that the employees properly de-energized, locked out, tagged, and tested the 4,160 VAC enclosure and internal components prior to performing work on the circuits.

Click here for the full investigation report 

 

“Best Practices” provided by MSHA: 
  • Follow these steps before performing electrical work inside a high voltage enclosure:
    1. Locate the high voltage visual disconnect away from the enclosure that supplies incoming electrical power to the enclosure.
    2. Open the visual disconnect to provide visual evidence that the incoming power cable(s) or conductors have been de-energized.
    3. Lock-out and tag-out the visual disconnect yourself. Never rely on others to do this for you.
    4. Ground the de-energized conductors.
  • Verify circuits are de-energized using properly rated electrical meters and non-contact voltage testers.
  • Ensure properly qualified miners perform all work on high voltage equipment.
  • Wear properly rated and well maintained personal protective equipment, including arc flash protection such as a hood, gloves, shirt and pants.
  • Train miners on safe work practices for high voltage electrical equipment and circuits.

 

COVID-19 June Update: We have options in place for you during this time

As the COVID-19 concerns are still very real, we’re providing the Arc Flash/NFPA 70E training virtually for everyone’s safety.

Students can complete the same live instructor-led, interactive courses in a safer environment.

  • Live Virtual classes now scheduling throughout this summer and fall
  • Whether it’s just a few or groups of 100 or more, we can help you get this accomplished
  • Scheduling at your convenience and we can accommodate multiple shifts

We want to assure you that we’re taking all necessary health and safety precautions in accordance with the CDC and local and state health officials, and we’ll continue to actively monitor developments related to Coronavirus (COVID-19). The health and safety of our customers and employees is our highest priority.

We understand so many are affected by this and concerned about COVID-19 and the unknown that it poses, and how long this could go on. As a critical service provider, we are committed to continue keeping you compliant and ensure employee safety throughout this time, and try to maintain some sense of normalcy, as much as possible!

If you’d prefer, we can still come on-site to your facility to conduct the training as long as the CDC requirements are met.

As a critical service provider, we are committed to continue supporting essential companies and protecting all workers throughout this challenging time. Feel free to contact us anytime 877-252-2626, info@jacmangroupsafety.com.

We are all in this together.