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What are the Top Electrical Hazards in the Workplace?

What are the Top Electrical Hazards in the Workplace?

Construction, manufacturing, and utility jobs are some of the leading industries in electrical accidents each year. It is estimated that about 9% of injury related deaths on construction sites are the result of electrocution and there are numerous electrical hazards construction workers are exposed to on a regular basis.

“According to the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), there are around 12 workplace injury fatalities every day in the U.S. Unfortunately, electrical accidents cause numerous injuries and even result in many deaths every year.”

The top electrical hazards in the workplace include exposed parts and electrical wires, damaged insulation, overhead power lines, improper use of equipment, wet conditions, and a power supply that is not grounded. Electrical hazards can have a variety of consequences, ranging from electrocution and shocks, to fires and even explosions. The outcomes of these hazards can be detrimental, often causing long-term complications for the worker if they survive the incident.

“In 2019, there were 166 electrical fatalities in the United States, with 8% of all electrical injuries fatal. The highest electrical fatality rate was in the construction industry, with utility workplaces the second highest.”

Even if a worker thinks they’re working safely, accidents do happen. There are steps that employers can take to minimize these risks – such as safety training, personal protective equipment, and regular inspections of both the equipment and job site.

 

See the full article here for more details on the common electrical hazards in the workplace.

Site C Contractor Fined $662,102 by WorkSafeBC

WorkSafeBC fines Site C Contractor $662,102

FORT ST. JOHN, B.C. – Peace River Hydro Partners, has been fined $662,102.48 by WorkSafeBC.

The fine was imposed on August 21, 2019, after a worker sustained an electrical shock injury. A worker was able to access the main circuit breaker in a high-voltage electrical cabinet for tunnelling equipment.

According to WorkSafeBC, the main electrical breaker extensions on the exterior cabinet door were not functioning, the de-energization switches had been circumvented and the main breaker switch-box isolation covers were in disrepair.

WorkSafeBC staff also determined that it was a standard work practice at this site to access the main circuit breaker without following lockout procedures.

A stop-use order was issued for the tunnelling equipment because Peace River Hydro Partners failed to ensure its equipment was capable of safely performing its functions, and was unable to provide its workers with the information, instruction, training, and supervision necessary to ensure their health and safety.

WorkSafeBC says these were both repeated violations.

This is the largest fine WorkSafeBC can issue under B.C. legislation.  The report from WorkSafeBC did not disclose the condition of the worker or the exact date of the incident.

Click here for this article from EnergeticCity.ca