Testimonials

Worker electrocuted in Utah – Investigation underway to determine what went wrong

A construction worker died from electrocution on Monday morning in South Jordan, Utah.

Witnesses say they saw “flashes” while hearing an “explosion” at the same time, said South Jordan Police Sgt. Eric Hill.

Paramedics were called, but the man, who was identified as 50-year-old Shaun Robertson, died on scene before they arrived.

“It is extremely unfortunate that he was here working and doing his job, and had an unfortunate accident,” Hill said.

It was believed Robertson was part of a crew installing underground lines, he said. What exactly caused him to be electrocuted was not immediately known Monday.

 

For more on this incident: KSL.com Article, or Deseret News Article

CAL/OSHA Investigating Fatal Electrocution

The city refused to identify the employee while withholding other details about the death, saying the workplace fatality was being investigated. The Sonoma County Coroner’s Office had not released the victim’s name as of Thursday night.

The city followed up with their own call to state regulators about the fatality shortly after paramedics and police arrived at the scene, she added.

Cal/OSHA was told that thee employee had been doing work on an energized subpanel at the site before electrocuted, Cal/OSHA spokesman Lucas Brown said.

Click here for the original news brief in The Press Democrat

 

OSHA fines TPC Group $514,692 for willful violations linked to explosion

OSHA fines TPC Group $514,692 for willful violations linked to explosion

TPC Group faces $514,692 in fines from the Occupational Safety and Health Administration and is accused of three willful violations — the most severe and rare category used by the agency — after OSHA concluded its investigation into the Nov. 27 plant explosion in Port Neches.

OSHA announced its conclusions Wednesday, giving some of the first official glimpses of potential failures at the plant since a vapor cloud explosion under a butadiene processing tower ignited flames that burned for weeks at the site and injured three people.

“OSHA cited TPC for three willful violations for failing to develop and implement procedures for emergency shutdown, and inspect and test process vessel and piping components,” representatives from the agency wrote in a statement.

Of the willful violations, OSHA concluded that TPC Group failed to provide updated instructions on how to shut down affected equipment, didn’t fix deficient equipment that could have caused the incident or alerted workers to a problem, and failed to use proper procedures on a pipeline design known to cause issues when using butadiene.

Click here for the rest of the article

COVID-19 Update

Arc Flash Training for Essential Workers

We understand so many are affected by this and concerned about COVID-19 and the unknown that it poses, and how long this could go on. We are here and will continue to keep you compliant and ensure employee safety throughout this time, and try to maintain some sense of normalcy, as much as possible!

We want to assure you that we’re taking all necessary health and safety precautions in accordance with the CDC and local and state health officials, and we’ll continue to actively monitor developments related to coronavirus (COVID-19). The health and safety of our customers and employees is our highest priority.

We know the services our customers provide are essential and we are committed to continue supporting you. We have remote and flexible options in place for you during these times.

We will get through this together.

CDC Recommendations to help Employers deal with Coronavirus (Covid-19)

The CDC has put together the Interim Guidance for Businesses and Employers to help
Plan, Prepare and Respond to the Coronavirus in the workplace

The interim guidance may help prevent workplace exposures to acute respiratory illnesses, including COVID-19, in non-healthcare settings. The guidance also provides planning considerations if there are more widespread, community outbreaks of COVID-19.

To prevent stigma and discrimination in the workplace, use only the guidance described below to determine risk of COVID-19. Do not make determinations of risk based on race or country of origin, and be sure to maintain confidentiality of people with confirmed COVID-19. There is much more to learn about the transmissibility, severity, and other features of COVID-19 and investigations are ongoing. Updates are available on CDC’s COVID-19 web page.

Click here to view the CDC Interim Guidance for Businesses and Employers

Electrical burst kills Amtrak worker in the Bronx, article from NY Daily News

An electrical explosion killed an Amtrak worker in a Bronx power substation Thursday morning, officials said.

The explosion erupted about 11:30 a.m. in Con Ed’s Van Nest Yard, which the company shares with Amtrak, on Unionport Road near White Plains Road in Parkchester.

The Amtrak worker was electrocuted, according to police. Two other people suffered minor injuries, officials said.

Authorities cut the power and were on scene investigating.

Ron Seabrook, 76, who’s lived near yard for 30 years, said the workers should have been better protected from harm.

“Something had to be exposed for him touch something or do something for him to lose his life,” he said. “It makes me feel bad for that individual, whoever it was. I’m quite sure they felt they were safe.”

Click here for the full article from NY Daily News