Testimonials

Empire State Mine resumes underground mining operations

Empire State Mine resumes underground mining operations after a hoist malfunction on Friday, that was caused by an “electrical problem”.

140 workers were unable to go back underground in the mine because of an accident that happened Friday, when an elevator taking workers down into the mine abruptly stopped and injured 9 workers. 

Mine officials say the elevator stopped because the braking system malfunctioned. 

Two of the injured miners are recovering at home. Mine officials say one has a dislocated knee; the other a broken ankle.

Below is the full news release from Empire State Mine:

Underground mining operations have resumed at the Empire State Mine following a hoist incident that occurred on July 27, 2018. During routine transportation of personnel underground, the braking system on the personnel conveyance (“cage”) unexpectedly engaged causing it to stop abruptly. The braking system then released, causing the cage to resume its travel downwards at normal speed at which time the hoist operator pushed the emergency stop button, bringing the cage to a controlled stop before returning the personnel to the surface.

Of the 30 contractors travelling in the cage, nine had injuries ranging from sprains and strains to a fracture, and were treated at local hospitals. Seven of the contractors were released immediately. The remaining contractors, one of whom had a dislocated knee and the other a fractured ankle, are at home recovering. Mine management has been in regular contact with the individuals affected by the incident, and their families, to provide support.

The incident was investigated by the company, third party hoist engineering experts, and the Mine Safety and Health Administration (“MSHA”). The cause of the incident was electrical in nature, and immediate corrective actions have been taken. Additional safeguards, including backup power supply, are being implemented to prevent recurrence.

The operation of the hoist has been approved by MSHA and underground operations resumed late yesterday.

The safety and well-being of our people is our top priority as we ramp up production at the Empire State Mine,” stated Keith Boyle, Chief Operating Officer. 

Click here for the article directly from WWNY

Contractor suffered severe electrical burns in accident

NORTH HAVEN, Conn. (WTNH) – Fire crews are on scene at a North Haven business after a person suffered severe electrical burns in an accident on Wednesday morning.

The fire department says that emergency crews are on scene at Ulbrich Stainless Steels & Special Metals, Inc. at 55 Defco Park Road to treat an outdoor contractor with severe electrical burns following an accident within the building. 

The victim, who has not yet been identified, was taken to the Bridgeport Burn Center for treatment. Their current condition is unknown. 

Multiple agencies are on scene investigating the incident. United Illuminating is also on the scene to cut power off to the building and provide safety. 

There is no word on the nature of the accident at this time.

News 8 has a crew on the way to the scene. Check back for more updates.
Click here for the News 8 article

Work Electrocution While on the Job

Modesto City Worker Dies of Electrocution While on the Job

An employee of the City of Medesto was electrocuted while on the job and city officials confirm the employee of six years has died.

It was a tragic work-related accident that took the life of Tyrone Hairston.

Candles and flowers have been placed near where Cal/OSHA says he was electrocuted while installing a street light.

In a statement to FOX40, the City of Modesto spokesman said Hairston was proud of his work as an electrician assistant and had a high work ethic. The city manager said in a statement:

“This incident is a tragic reminder of the hazards some of our employees face in the field, and underscores the criticality of our maintenance work.”

City of Modesto employees and his family are devastated. They say he was the kind of guy who helped anyone in need and greeted everyone with a smile.

Cal/OSHA says they are now investigating and add, “Cal/OSHA has six months to issue citations for any violations of workplace safety.” A spokesman said the cause of the accident will be made available when their inspection is complete.

The city manager ended his statement with, “We thrive under a culture of supporting one another, and should take this opportunity to show care for those around us.”

Story from FOX40

Gold Mine Worker Suffered Severe Burns from Arc Flash Incident

Gold Mine Worker Suffered Severe Burns from Arc Flash Incident

A potential arc flash incident caused an electrical worker from the Central Norseman Gold Corporation to sustain severe burns to his hands and face while working in the Central Norseman gold mine. The incident occurred the morning of February 9, 2018 and is currently under investigation by the Department of Mines, Industry Regulation and Safety.

Andrew Chaplyn, the director of safety at DMIRS, confirmed that the site where the incident took place has been secured. The worker is currently in stable condition at the Fiona Stanley Hospital burns unit, where he has been since Thursday evening.

The Department of Mines, Industry Regulation and Safety confirmed it was investigating the incident, which occurred on Thursday morning at the mine, about 190km south of Kalgoorlie-Boulder.

Click here for the full story.

OSHA Cites Wiring Subcontractor after Arc Flash burns worker at the Plant Bowen facility

Notes from OSHA Regional News Brief – Region 4

OSHA cites Georgia Power, wiring subcontractor after arc flash severely burns worker at the Plant Bowen facility; proposes $122K in fines

Employers failed to power down cabinet before electrician began work

U.S. Department of Labor OSHA inspectors opened an investigation on Oct. 27, 2015, after learning an electric arc flash injured a worker at Georgia Power’s Plant Bowen generating facility. When the arc flash occurred, a 48-year-old electrician was working on an electrical cabinet that was still powered. The ABB Inc. employee suffered second and third-degree burns to his hands, arms and torso.

Georgia Power received two repeated, five serious and two other-than-serious safety citations. The repeated violations relate to the employer failing to ensure the electrical cabinet was not powered down before allowing work to begin and not developing specific steps to power down machinery and prevent starting up during maintenance and servicing. Apparently, Georgia Power was previously cited for similar violations at this facility in 2014.

The company’s serious violations relate to its failure to:

  • Ensure proper grounding of electrical equipment.
  • Inform other employers of their electrical lockout program.
  • Provide adequate procedures for electrical energy isolation.

ABB Inc. was issued two serious citations. The serious violations relate to the employer’s failure to coordinate with other employers on the specific requirements of removing power from equipment before maintenance and servicing and exposing workers to electrical hazards.

Quote: “Every day, employees place their trust in their employers to keep them safe while they work, unfortunately Georgia Power and ABB failed to ensure the cabinet was properly de-energized before allowing the electrician to begin working. This incident was totally preventable if his employers simply followed OSHA standards,” said Christi Griffin, OSHA’s director of the Atlanta-West Office.

Click here to read the actual news brief from OSHA