Testimonials

“Electrical arc formed…. and electrocuted him”

Man electrocuted in accident in Fermont

CNESST, the provincial workplace, health and safety commission, has opened an investigation.

A 62-year-old man was electrocuted Saturday morning while trying to remove a backhoe that got stuck in some electrical wires in Fermont, a town on the North Shore near the border with Labrador.

The backhoe slid down a slope on Highway 389, coming to a stop near the wires, according to the Sûreté du Québec.

The man was in the process of retrieving the backhoe when an electrical arc formed from the wires and electrocuted him.

He collapsed in the snow and was pronounced dead after being transported to hospital.

Employees from Hydro-Québec and Transports Québec arrived to secure the area.

Click here for the article from the Montreal Gazette

 

NFPA reports “substantial share” of contractor deaths involving electrical incidents in the construction industry, during recent 5 year period

NFPA reports “substantial share” of contractor deaths involving electrical incidents in the construction industry, during recent 5 year period

The construction industry experienced a “substantial share” of contractor deaths involving electrical incidents during a recent five-year period, according to a report from the National Fire Protection Association.

NFPA senior research analyst Richard Campbell examined Census of Fatal Occupational Injuries data for contract worker deaths from 2012 to 2016. “Contracted worker” was defined as “employed by one firm but working at the behest of another firm that exercises overall responsibility for the operations at the site” where the fatality occurred.

Data showed that 325 electrical fatalities involved contract workers during the studied time period. In 2016, 63 cases occurred, ending a three-year rise that peaked at 76 in 2015.

Campbell notes in the report that time and budgetary pressures in the industry may cause workers to try to complete jobs faster or work longer hours – “both of which can compromise safety.”

To help reduce the number of electrical deaths and improve safety, NFPA recommends that:

  • Contractors establish reasonable expectations for when work will get done and not promise unrealistic deliverables in hopes of landing a contract.
  • Owners select contractors based on reliability and safety considerations. Contractors should do the same when selecting subcontractors.
  • Top management communicate to supervisors, whose responsibilities include both keeping production on track and ensuring work is done safely, that safety must not be compromised when schedules are threatened.

Exposure to electricity was the fifth-leading cause of work-related death for contract workers during the five-year period.

Slips, trips and falls were the leading causes of death (1,350 fatalities), followed by contact with objects and equipment (951) and transportation incidents (813).

Click here for the entire article from Safety+Health Magazine.

Shock and Burn at Extell project site

A construction worker was electrocuted early yesterday during a work accident at 227 Cherry Street in New York City. The man reportedly sustained second-degree burns about the arms, neck, and head, but was conscious when paramedics arrived. He was later taken to the hospital in stable condition.

The Fire Department is investigating the incident and requested the Department of Buildings perform an inspection to learn more about what happened.

Click here to learn more about the incident.

Construction worker loses his life due to apparent electrical shock

SALT LAKE CITY — A 33-year-old construction worker died from an electrical shock at a job site in Salt Lake City, officials said Tuesday morning.

The man was a sub-contractor doing electrical work for an expansion being built at the state archives located at 346 S. Rio Grande Street, said Salt Lake City police detective Greg Wilking.

It appears the man died Monday afternoon from an electrical shock, but was working alone in the corner of a room that is not easily visible, according to Wilking. Co-workers did not notice him and closed the construction site for the night.

The man’s wife contacted the company when her husband did not come home, but the company had no information.
Co-workers searched the construction site Tuesday morning and found the man’s body.

Click here to read more directly from the KSL article

 

U.S. Department of Labor Cites Ohio Recycling Company for Safety Violations

News Release

U.S. Department of Labor Cites Ohio Recycling Company for Safety Violations

COLUMBUS, OH – The U.S. Department of Labor’s Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) has cited Sewing Collection Inc. – a coat hanger recycling company – for serious and repeat safety violations. The Columbus, Ohio-based company faces proposed penalties totaling $190,247.

An inspection in April 2018 found that the company exposed employees to fall, machine guarding, and electrical hazards; failed to train forklift operators; and did not have proper emergency exit signage.

“Employers have a responsibility to conduct workplace hazard assessments regularly to determine appropriate measures at protecting workers’ safety and health,” said OSHA Columbus Area Office Director Larry Johnson. “This company’s failure to comply with federal safety requirements needlessly exposed employees to workplace injuries.”

Click here for more information and to read the news release directly from OSHA